Starter Classes
Alan  Turing - and the Birth of Computers and Chatbots with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Applied Computer Science

Chatbots have only recently began to enter into our lives mostly as virtual assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant. However, the concept of a chatbot was born dates back to the advent of computers themselves. Back in 1948 Alan Turing conceptualised a binary computer and immediately set a benchmark for what it would take to call a computer intelligent: The Imitation Game (a.k.a. The Turing Test) In this program you will learn how far conversational chatbots have come in 2020 and chat with the best chatbots on the internet. Before we are done we will have an in-depth look under the hood of an Advanced Python Chatbot which you will clone and modify to make it your virtual companion.

Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Fractals and the Art of Code with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Applied Computer Science

Every day video games and animated movies move closer to resembling reality, this is made possible in great part through our understanding of fractals which are self similar patterns that occur everywhere in nature: shells, clouds, plant life, river systems etc . . .  In this program we will journey through history to find out how the invention of computers unleashed fractal geometry and even lead many prominent physicists to declare that we are probably living in a simulation! Before we wrap up we will modify some basic Python code that creates fractal shapes so that with just a few added lines you will be creating your own unique spirals and snowflakes in the browser, these programs will be available to you even after the session.


Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Hands-on Introduction to Artifical Intelligence with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Applied Computer Science

One of the most fundamental aspects of human intelligence is the fact that we are creatures that learn and communicate what we know. We have all learned how to read, how to walk, how to talk and in this workshop, we will be learning how to program a computer. We will also be finding out whether the machines we are programming are capable of learning in ways similar to us. We will learn the importance of data, and find out how computers use data to learn how to perform tasks. We will also get to engage with artificially intelligent systems that recognise images, find meaning in texts and even play music that matches the sounds that you make.


Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Introduction to Microcontrollers and the BBC Micro:bit with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Applied Computer Science

You may have heard of one of these buzz words: Embedded Computing, Physical Tech and the Internet of Things . . . well they all mean the same thing: Small microcontroller  (computers on a microchip) are now so cheap and abundant that they are embedded in everything from your watches, whitegoods to your exercise equipment. Tens of billions of these devices connecting to the cloud make up the Internet of Things. So in this program, you will learn about how this technology will change our lives and then we will have a go at programming an amazing little microcontroller called the BBC micro:bit to make it count steps and measure reaction time.


Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Master Classes
Artificially Intelligent Chatbots with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Applied Computer Science

In 1950 Alan Turing set the benchmark for Artificial Intelligence as a computer that can carry on an in-depth text conversation with a human. . . In 2020 we interact with useful chatbots like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant all of which do chores and help us organize our lives. Yet despite becoming super useful and superior to us in many games we play (Chess, Jeopardy, Go etc . . .) computers still don’t seem all that human. . . In this workshop, we will try to change that by learning how to use Python to program chatbots to recognise emotion and be more spontaneous (random) in their interaction with us.
 
Session 1: Basic Text Parsing and responding to Yes / No questions
In this session, we create a chatbot that can ask and appropriately respond to Yes / No questions and account for a very large variety of responses
 
Session 2: Adding Text-Based Games to the Chatbot
In this session we will create two games that are built into the chatbot, the first is a Guess The Number game and the second is a Touch Typing Speed test where the chatbot generates pangrams and the user races against time to type these pangrams in.
 
Session 3: Mood and Memory
In this sessions, we help the chatbot become more human by creating a mood variable which influences the way it interacts with people (kindly or rudely) We will also create a memory of past interactions and so the chatbot will remember some people fondly and others . . . well not very fondly at all.
 
Session 4: Natural Language Processing and Sentiment Analysis
In this session, we get introduced to the field of Natural Language Processing which aims to help computers make sense of and synthesise human language. We then apply some simple and yet powerful functions to make our bot understand human emotion and respond appropriately and even show some empathy.



Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Game Design with Pygame with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Programming and Game Design

The 1970s brought video games to the world with an all-time classic called Pong. The game basically consisted of two rectangular paddles moving up and down and trying to bounce a square ball past each other. . . This simple game was strangely compelling and gave rise to a gaming revolution that is still with us today.  In this masterclass, we will be programming a full version of Pong with both human and computer players, a scorekeeping system and escalating difficulty. We will also be re-creating a modern classic game called Agar.io, which is a game centred around a dot that grows as it eats other dots that are smaller than it and in turn runs away from larger dots that can eat it.
 
Session 1: Introduction to Pygame
In this session, students get introduced to Pygame, its special functions and go on to draw a variety of shapes on the Pygame screen. We conclude by creating a ball that bounces off the edges of the screen
 
Session 2: Paddle Ball Game
In this session, we upgrade the bouncing ball into a game very similar to pong where the player controls a paddle either by a mouse or arrow keys and tries to keep the ball from dropping down. This is a challenge because the game keeps getting harder as the score increases
 
Session 3: Agar.io game
In this session, we will get introduced to Object-Oriented Programming which is a mode of programming used with most computer games. We will create blob and food objects and have blobs collect food and then try to eat each other with a wonderful catch: only bigger blobs can eat smaller blobs but smaller blobs are faster than the bigger blobs.
 
Session 4: Mini Space Invaders
In this session, we apply object-oriented programming to an all-time classic game concept space invaders. We will re-create one level of this game creating a hero, an enemy (which is cloned 20 times) and give the hero the ability to shoot which sets the stage for an epic battle to for our home planet.


Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Making Games with Python Turtle with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Programming and Game Design

Python Turtle, also known as Logo has been a programming smash hit with beginners since the ’70s In this workshop we will be using it a little differently. We will program two little games using Turtle: the first is a simplified version of space invaders where the players dodge a rain of bricks and the second is a classic rendition of Angry Birds where we will have two players targeting each other with projectiles whose motion is programmed in by the classic Newtonian Equations
 
Session 1: Introduction to Turtle and the ultimate Turtle Race
In this session, we will go back in time to the 1970s and the beginning of a revolution that spawned the first programming language design for kids called Logo, which is still with us today. It involves writing code to make a turtle move across a canvas. we will learn the 10 most popular turtle functions and use them to create a little game where 4 Turtles race each other.
 
Session 2: Turtle Dodge Ball
In this session, we are going to get introduced to a key concept of game programming: Keyboard Events and use those to create a more advanced dynamic where a player controls the turtle with the arrow keys and attempts to dodge randomly moving balls that bounce off the walls of the play area.
 
Session 3: Turtle Tank Warfare Part 1
In this session, we are going to cover some trigonometry and the movement dynamics of projectiles. We will then program this into turtle objects and enjoy watching the animated arcs of projectiles. We will wrap the session with a to-do list of program features which would convert our fun simulation into a fully-fledged game
 
Session 4: Turtle Tank Warfare Part 2
In this session, we will create tanks that can launch projectiles as well as get hit by projectiles. These are then going to be placed randomly on a 2D plane and compete with each other by entering the speed and the angle for each launch. We will also program in the winning conditions and as well as player names.


Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
Micro:bit Microcontrollers and the Internet of Things with Sanjin Dedic
Years 6, 7 and 8: Programming and Game Design

In 2018 for the first time in history, there were more devices connected to the Internet of Things than there are people on earth . . . In 2020 there will be 31 Billion of them, but what kind of devices are these and why are they significant? Well, the vast majority of IoT devices are microcontrollers, small computers that live on one microchip and have less than 1% of computing power and memory of a smartphone. They are however very significant because they interface with the real world by sensing the environment and making automatic decisions. They operate traffic lights, automatic doors and elevators as well as all of your home appliances. In this masterclass, you will be learning to program one such microcontroller, called BBC micro:bit using Python. The micro:bit can sense acceleration, magnetic field, temperature, light intensity and human touch. We program games that measure reaction time and memory, distributed alarm systems and smart fitness gadgets that track your steps and help your coordination and balance.
 
 
Session 1: Introduction to MicroPython
In this session, we learn about microcontrollers, the Internet of Things and we program our first two games. The first of which is a Magic 8 Ball Game, the second is a Button Masher Program which is similar to cookie clicker game
 
Session 2: Reaction Time Games
In this session, we will program a game that measures how fast you can react to a light signal in hundredths of a second and then we will adapt our code to measure how fast you can make a simple decision (to press button A and button B)
 
Session 3: Brick Dodging Game and Balance Dot
This session is all about the measurement of forces using the built-in accelerometer, the first application we will build is a seismometer which displays the forces on x, y and z axis. We will follow this by creating a balance dot game where a dot moves by tilting the micro:bit and goes on to collect other dots
 
Session 4: Two Player Games and Radio Systems
In this session, we will build a two-player dice game and modify the Reaction time game to make it a 2 player game that you can play against a friend. We will wrap up the session demonstrating how these same 2 player games could be played with multiple micro:bits and discussing various applications that become possible as we use more micro:bits that are connected to each other via radio



Sanjin Dedic is a robotics engineer, author and an experienced educator in the field of Digital Technologies. Throughout his teaching career Sanjin has been at the forefront of the latest educational technologies, in 2013 he brought Arduino, 3D printing and the make movement ethos into the classroom, he since authored Python curriculum in use by dozens of Victorian schools and co-authored a book on the BBC micro:bit, both aimed at students in Years 7- 10. He currently teaches at the King David School in Melbourne, facilitates teacher training for Digital Learning and Teaching Victoria and delivers advanced online coding classes for G.A.T.E.WAYS and Head Start Academy

 
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